Saturday, December 16, 2017
Jeremy C. Holm homepage
Jeremy C. Holm Author
Jeremy C. Holm Author
Jeremy C. Holm Keynote Motivational Speaker
Jeremy C. Holm Graphic Designer

Why Elder Holland's Talk Meant So Much

Posted on October 06, 2013 by

This past Saturday, October 5, I had the opportunity to attend an anti-bullying event held in Salt Lake City, Utah. As I stood there watching the various attendees come through I spent a portion of the day pondering the bullies I had faced in my own life. From fellow students in school to fellow athletes in sport, I have tasted the bitter results of those who for one reason or another felt the need to force their own pains on another.

This time of meditation led me to think of another bully, one that can inflict true hurt and heartache. I speak of mental illness, a bully that no school Principal or mortal parent can ever put in "time out." No sibling can stand up to this bully on the "playground" of life and no spouse, friend or teammate can fully protect you from. This bully is the first to steal hope, happiness and energy from life.

I have often wondered what my life would be like if I had not been asked to carry this "thorn in the flesh" (2 Corinthians 12:7). Would I be married with a family by now? Would I have a more successful professional career? Would I have done more in my sport of bobsled and gone further? Would I have deeper relationships and friendships? Would I be a better light unto this dark and troubled world? The questions, and possible answers, are infinite and beyond my ability to comprehend. 

I do not think it was a coincidence that Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints spoke on mental illness during the Church's General Conference around the same time I was thinking of these things. His talk means so much to me is because despite the difficulties and complex challenges involved with such a trial, Elder Holland reminds us that there is always hope, even when depression or an emotional disorder makes it feel like there is none to be found. And believe me, they absolutely have the power to darken the horizon of even the brightest heart and mind. Elder Holland's acknowledgement of the power of mental illness was a lifeline extended to its sufferers who no longer have to struggle in silence. They can admit that they are suffering and do not need to do so alone or in fear that their faith is insufficient.

I know this battle. I begin fighting during my sophomore year of high school, back in 1996. I do not think it a coincidence that I began bobsledding shortly thereafter; God knew that I needed a source of hope, of strength and of purpose. There were many dark days when even the power of the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the light of the Olympics were just barely enough to save me from the dark. For years I asked many of the questions that are so common to those who believe in God, but do not understand why he will not save them from the storms of mental illness: "Doesn't God care that I'm suffering?" "If he loves me, why isn't he stopping this?" "What did I do to deserve this?" "Will I ever be healed?" "Must I suffer alone?"

Elder Holland's talk answers all of these questions, but perhaps the most powerful quote for me was, while at times we may feel like broken vessels, we must remember the “vessel is in the hands of the divine potter...Broken minds can be healed just the way broken bones and broken hearts are healed."

I have spent a long time feeling as though I was broken. I have wondered what was wrong with me, wondered why I bore such indescribable burdens that often felt like the bully I described earlier. I watched friends, teammates, mission companions and family members get married while I silently struggled and wondered if I could ever "get it together" enough for God to allow me to marry. I cannot begin to express the pain and heartache this has caused, for what greater obstacle can someone who wants an eternal marriage face than a mental/emotional illness that seemingly makes such a deep relationship impossible? 

To make the struggles worse, depression, anxiety and their ensuing effects have made my career in bobsled particularly challenging. Most of my fellow athletes, the officials and coaches have little idea of what courage, strength and sheer will it took some days just to show up to the track. I never went to the Olympics, but I know what it is like to have a dream to do so while battling a very real and even debilitating 

These are but two key areas of my life that my "thorn in the flesh" has affected, but as you can imagine mental illness touches ALL aspects of mortality. From Church service to career, schooling to social situations, charity work to family relationships are all influenced by mental illness, no matter how "strong" or "faithful" the person might be.

I have faced the dark. I have stood on the shores and watched the mental storms roll in while wondering if I would be strong enough to stand this time. I have felt the waves of discouragement and anxiety crash over my heart and soul as I have tried to stand tall in faith and hope. I haven't always won that fight. Many of you know that there was a time when I was so close to committing suicide that it was scary. Having been that low, I add my voice to Elder Holland's testimony when he said, "Whatever your struggle — mental or emotional or physical or otherwise — don’t vote against the preciousness of life by ending it."

I don't have all the answers. I have learned so much through this journey with the help of a loving Father in Heaven, wonderful friends and family, trusted medical professionals and inspired Church leaders. But perhaps the greatest thing I can say is to re-declare Elder Holland's challenge and promise, that "Trust in God. Hold on to His love. Know that one day the dawn will break brightly and all shadows of mortality will flee."

As Elder Holland stated, "we are infinitely more than our limitations and afflictions." Hold onto faith. Don't give up. Ask for help when you need it, but most of all never, ever let the dark of a mortal and therefore temporary illness put out the eternal flame of your divine heritage. 

 

Fire on Ice by Jeremy C Holm

Read 7353 times
Jeremy Holm

(Printable Bio) - American bobsled pilot and coach Jeremy Holm is a respected author, motivational speaker, journalist and graphic designer. Jeremy was born in Pennsylvania and grew up in Oklahoma and Utah where he currently resides. A graduate of Skyline High School, he attended Salt Lake Community College and Brigham Young University after serving a Christian mission to Honduras and Belize.

Jeremy became one of the world’s first adaptive bobsled coaches when he began instructing the U.S. Adaptive Bobsled Team in 2009. In 2008 Jeremy founded The Athlete Outreach Project, a philanthropic organization that uses sport and the Olympic movement to serve the community. Jeremy is also the author of two books: The Champion’s Way and Fire on Ice.

Newsletter

 

Now Available

Fire on Ice Jeremy C Holm
Racing down an icy track at 80 miles per hour leads you to think of many things. For Jeremy C. Holm, it made him think of God. In Fire and Ice, Holm shares his experiences as a bobsled pilot and coach, presenting a message of faith and personal courage that will inspire you to come closer to Jesus Christ and reach for that ultimate prize of eternal life.

Buy Now

The Champions Way Jeremy C Holm
How do we achieve gold medal moments in life? How do we find peace and confidence and what truly makes us happy? Discover the answers in Jeremy's new ebook, "The Champion's Way", available now at Amazon.com

Buy Now