Saturday, November 25, 2017
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Hi I'm Jeremy Holm and I'm a Mormon

I'm a bobsled pilot, author, motivational speaker, graphic and web designer and disciple of Jesus Christ...

ABOUT ME:

Growing up in the fast-paced world of the winter sport of bobsled, my faith in Jesus Christ has been a constant reminder of what matters most. Standing out there on the cold ice, the Spirit has been a constant companion that has helped warm my heart and mind. I have been piloting bobsleds since 1997, but I have also graduated from college, served a full-time mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, written a few books, coached some of the first Paralympic bobsled athletes in the world and much more. I grew up in the Church and am eternally grateful for the blessings that have come into my life through the knowledge and authority found therein.

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Jeremy Holm, team captain for Team Holm Bobsled, said he decided at a young age that bobsledding was his calling to share the Gospel in a very exhilarating and powerful way. At age 17 he was given the opportunity to ride in a bobsled and immediately found his life's passion. Taking only a two-year break from bobsledding to serve a mission in Honduras and Belize, this is his life and people can see it as soon as they meet him.

“Throughout the years I’ve had a lot of friends and family come up and watch me train or race, and they all say the same thing," Holm said, "they all say that I’m a totally different person, I’m so focused, that I’m more happy than I normally am. It’s like that place is my home.”

Many people would consider this a crazy and wild way to live life; however, Holm considers it a blessing and loves sharing it with everyone.

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Four athletes visited the Murray Boys and Girls Club Thursday to inspire children to pursue their dreams in honor of the 9/11 National Day of Service and Remembrance. The athletes, including two Olympians, are part of Athletes for Hope, a national group that encourages members to give back to their communities.

"I think, for us as athletes, representing the nation is a great feeling, and I think, in some ways, we all realize the small part we can play in inspiring and helping others," said Jeremy Holm, a Utah native and professional bobsledder. "We think of the heroes from 9/11 — firefighters, police officers, service workers — we think of those heroes and the inspiration they gave to all of us, and I think, as athletes, we just do our best to give back."

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This month the world will watch as nearly 2,500 athletes from 85 countries compete in the XXth Olympic Winter Games held in Turino, Italy. Our eyes and ears will be fi lled with stories of success, and the agony of defeat. The wins and losses of athletes will become common speech in our everyday lives for those 16 days as they compete for Olympic glory in a country thousands of miles away from their homes.

Athletes compete in the Olympics for many reasons. Opinions vary a great deal as to what those reasons are. Money, say some. Fame, say others. Only the athlete that represents his or her country can answer the question of their motive. We decided to get an insider’s view by talking to a local college-aged athlete, Jeremy Holm, who trains and competes for the United States in the sport of bobsled.

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Gov. Mike Leavitt's goal Saturday in the Governor's Cup Bobsled Race was to get more kids involved in Olympic sports like bobsledding.

Monte Mounga's goal was to get down the Utah Winter Sports track faster than Leavitt.They both got what they wanted.

Mounga, a Utah sponsor of Tongan bobsledders, told his bobsled coach, 17-year-old Jeremy Holm of Salt Lake City, that he wanted to beat the governor. Holm nodded in agreement. They climbed inside Roy High's school-built sled, traveled through a couple of mind-numbing turns at speeds over 40 miles an hour and finished in 36.88 seconds.

Good enough for the gold.

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Gov. Michael Leavitt and new Salt Lake Organizing Committee President Mitt Romney met Saturday at the Utah Winter Sports Park in Park City to see who could move at faster speeds in a two-man bobsled.

Although the Leavitt vs. Romney match was the most anticipated of the day, Mote Mounga stole the show from both of them. Mounga, a Utah sponsor of Tongan bobsledders, won the event with a time of 36.88 seconds. He was teamed up with Jeremy Holm, 17, of Salt Lake City.

The winning bobsled was designed and built by students from Roy High School. The sled built by Granite High finished second behind the team of Leavitt and Wooten. Romney and Heaton finished third, driving the Ben Lomond sled. Finishing fourth place was the South Summit bobsled driven by Robert Brems and Ryan Darton.

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